in ear on stage monitors-anyone using this?

The gear that's hot and gear that's not. Live sound can make or break your gig. Microphone placement,Mixing Boards, Power amps and speakers.

in ear on stage monitors-anyone using this?

Postby steveokla on Fri Aug 07, 2009 3:12 pm

You know how it goes: I can rarely hear my guitar and so end-up cranked to levels that fry chickens (and the audience) for 50 yards; can't tell if I'm singing on key; eveything's out of balance, etc.. Wedges never really worked for me, and I've been wondering about the in-ear on stage monitors. Thing is, I'm not talking about huge venue, 'concert' performances--just regular old gigs in medium-sized venues with pretty basic gear. I could sure use a primer on the wireless, in-ear monitors from someone. Thanks, Steveokla
steveokla
Baron
 
Posts: 3203
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2005 7:55 pm
Location: oklahoma

Re: in ear on stage monitors-anyone using this?

Postby onedrum on Mon Aug 17, 2009 8:56 am

Good in ear systems are not cheap at all, and unless they're perfectly set up with a separate mixer and a room mic, you're likely to get less than desirable results. An easier and cheaper approach would be to either work more closely with the sound tech to get a better monitor mix, or to actually build an ext. cab that points up at you from the floor. Then you'd just be using the stage wedge for vocals. If you regularly have your amp too loud, this is a great way to find out... cuz you'll be way too loud for yourself.....which is VERY OFTEN the problem. I can honestly say guitar players being too loud are 50% of the problem live sound engineers have. The other 50% can be evenly distributed amongst quiet singers, wimpy drummers and loud keyboard players! :lol:

But seriously, if the drummer/band is too loud and there's no way around it, aaaand you don't mind spending the dough, I'd say go for it!

OPTION 1:
For starters, you'll need to buy a small mixer with direct outs on each channel. Your signal routing will essentially go as follows:

-Mic up the guitar with whatever mic the venue uses. Plug that mic directly into your mixer first. Send that signal out of the channel's direct out into the venue's snake.
-Do the same with your vocal mic.
-Place a condenser mic on a stand somewhere so that you can hear ambient sounds. This is to eliminate some of the isolation you'll experience once the ear buds are in. You'll find your own favorite place for this with time. (you'll either want it so you hear the band for timing, or for crowd interaction or both). Be sure and let the venue tech know you'll be using this mic just for yourself. You'll also need to supply phantom power to this mic, which shouldn't affect the venue but they'll likely wanna know anyway.
-Choose how you want to send the signal to your in ear system from your mixer. This can either be from an aux send, or a fader/main out. Pre-Fade aux send is generally better for this particular application because you can twist a knob and it will generally stay there, as opposed to a fader which can be bumped around, screwing up your mix.
-Make sure you set your input trims correctly. Too hot, and you'll get gross distortion. Too little and you'll get tons of noise.
-It should also be mentioned that you could buy a small snake with a multi-channel split instead of using direct outs on a board. (just another way of splitting the signal for you and the venue)

OPTION 2:
Ask the sound tech for the XLR line that would usually come out of the board for your mix, and instead of going to the amp/eq/wedge in his/her rig, just going directly into your in ear system. The upside to this method is obviously ease of set up and you can be sent any part of the band you need to hear. The downside to this is an inexperienced tech can easily blow up you ear buds by not having experience with in ears, or worse yet, damage your hearing by accidentally sending something weird straight to you via a hot signal, or a pop from enabling phantom power somewhere.

One other thing.. don't just use one ear bud, use both. Google it.. there's plenty of info regarding that issue!!

Hope this helps, and if anyone else has any ideas or experience with in ears, do tell! I'm always down for learning new tips and tricks to make me a better tech, and in turn make artists happier and more comfortable on stage!
http://www.myspace.com/theafterbeat Bastardized '87 CSA 4212, 2000 Garnet Mohawk, '60's Kiel modded by the late great Gar Gillies
onedrum
Page
 
Posts: 466
Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2008 4:04 am
Location: Winnipeg Canada

Re: in ear on stage monitors-anyone using this?

Postby steveokla on Tue Aug 18, 2009 3:32 am

Thank you very much! That's great info and genuinely appreciated. You've given me a great base to proceed from. Best, Steveokla
steveokla
Baron
 
Posts: 3203
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2005 7:55 pm
Location: oklahoma


Return to Live Sound Reinforcement

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests