Strange Grain Mahogony

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Strange Grain Mahogony

Postby 52Boomer on Wed Apr 01, 2009 10:42 pm

This is the back of my Gary Moore model Les Paul. I wonder if this type of mahogony is good, inferior or just different. The neck is very dark and the body lighter colored and has a wavy grain. I don't know if it is weight relieved. Ever seen anything like this on a guitar :?:

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Re: Strange Grain Mahogony

Postby Easto on Thu Apr 02, 2009 5:45 pm

Although I'm no wood expert... I wouldn't give it a second thought unless you find the visual unapealing.
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Re: Strange Grain Mahogony

Postby 52Boomer on Thu Apr 02, 2009 6:44 pm

I dunno, looks as if the neck is some other kind of wood, like Teak or Koa. I've read where wood from the top of a Mahogony tree might have different properties than wood from the bottom. Most Mahogony I've seen on Gibsons has been pretty plain looking. :dunno:
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Re: Strange Grain Mahogony

Postby christco on Fri Apr 10, 2009 4:48 pm

I've seen mahogany grain like that before. I wouldn't worry about it. BTW, it is almost definitely weight relieved. All LP models that aren't Historic or VOS or whatever the heck they're calling the Custom Shop line these days are.
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Re: Strange Grain Mahogony

Postby Vertec on Thu Apr 16, 2009 4:09 am

ok i read this post aweek ago and didnt see the pic of the body, but now i have i can tell you whats happening

with your neck it is NOT a problem or anything different other than the age of the tree because as a requirment all necks of gibsons are quarter sawn 100% of the time because of the need for it to hold the tension of the strings.
now to the body what you see on normal gibson backs is quarter sawn but yours has a rare cut called rift sawn it is in between quarter witch comes from the 90' angle cut near the middle as you move out the grain starts to move at 45' angles from left to right or vice versa depending on the side of the tree and the way they use it, when you use wood from very near the outside edge this is called flat sawn because of the way the grain moves it is nearly 85% of the plain tops we see these days that have very little grain and little to no figuring,
the best figuring comes from rift sawn witch gibson has used on there tops since 1958 with the few exceptions of quarter and flat sawn making it threw the process to become the tops.


this picture is for more wood working but see the wood to the middle left is quarter the grain is in stacked lines were the flat sawn at the top is very very wide between rings rift is inbetween. non of this affects tone or strength of the BACK of the gibson but it would affect the neck, but as said gibson worked this out along time ago to use quarter sawn on there necks, on the L5's and other models in the early 19' century if they were to use it they would have 89% of gibsons going back to the factory w/ neck repairs and hence DONT do it
http://www.arkansawyer.net/quarterSawn.JPG






hope this helps answer your question, if you need anymore questions about how they did it just ask :wink: i've made it my past time to look into the history of the LP
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Re: Strange Grain Mahogony

Postby 52Boomer on Thu Apr 16, 2009 12:43 pm

Thank you, Vertec, I had suspected that my guitar had been made from odd bits and pieces lying about the Gibson factory. I wish that they would use better rosewood for the fret boards. Mine keeps drying out, even though I have tried both Lemon oil and Bore oil. If it were Ebony, I doubt if it would require much maintainence. Some Studio models have Ebony fretboards, so I figure you could get one on any Les Paul, except it would come from the custom shop. Here is the top:

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Re: Strange Grain Mahogony

Postby Vertec on Fri Apr 17, 2009 12:04 am

did it come stock w/ the string over bridge and bridge flush to the body?
been looking into that for some time, over the 40+ vintage 58,59&60 LP's ive been looking at nearly 90% of em have the bridge flush i do it on my lp but i dont go over i used fret files to curve the very back of the sadle down slightly and take off anything sharp that could cause string brakage
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Re: Strange Grain Mahogony

Postby 52Boomer on Fri Apr 17, 2009 11:35 am

I started doing it because some of the members here were doing it. :) If you have a Nashville Tune-O-Matic you'll run into problems. :? The high E string will not clear the bridge. :( This is not a problem with the Historics. I had to file a notch into the bridge so the string would not be touching the edge of the Tune-O-Matic. :idea:
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